International Academic Research Journal of Medical Sciences (IARJMS) - ISSN 2413-8304 (Print)

International Academic Research Journal of Medical Sciences (IARJMS) is a Double-blind peer reviewed newly launched quarterly scientific journal dedicated to publish good quality of research work in all areas of medical sciences. Scope of the journal includes: medicine, dentistry, nursing and allied health sciences, pharmacy, pathology, anatomy, pharmacology, toxicology, surgery and physiology.

International Academic Research Journal of Medical Sciences is one of the speciality Journal in Medical Science published by International Academic Research Journal of Medical Sciences (IARJMS). The Journal publishes papers of the highest scientific merit and widest possible scope work in all areas related to medical and dental science. The Journal welcome review articles, leading medical and clinical research articles, technical notes, case reports and others.

Vol No. 2 Issue 1 : January 2017
A Secondary Analysis of SEER Data: Association between Gender, Race and Melanoma Stage in U.S Adults from 1973 to 2011 Pages From : 01-04
Author(s) : Albaqami Faisal,Aldughaythir Mohammad,Acuņa, Juan M.,Aldaham Sami A.
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    Melanoma is a neoplasm arising from melanocytes. It is the fifth common cancer in thernUnited States; it is the main cause of deaths from skin cancers. There is improvement inrnfive-year survival rates for melanoma from 82% in 1975 to 92% in 2004; however the overallrnmortality rate remains unchanged. Objective: Our study aims to assess the association ofrngender and race to the stage of melanoma at diagnosis in US population. Materials &rnmethods: We used data from SEER from 1973 to 2011. We excluded from the analysis byrnusing SPSS duplicate patients and subjects less than 18 years old. The study includesrn227,509 melanoma patients. Main study variables included gender, race and stage.rnUnadjusted and adjusted logistic regression was used to adjust for potential confounders.rnOR and 95%CI were calculated. Results: Males diagnosed with melanoma were olderrncompared to females (mean= 58.5 and 55.2 years old respectively, p-value= <0.001). Blackrnpatients were diagnosed at a younger age than whites and other races (mean=46.3, 57.4, andrn55.2 years old respectively, p-value= <0.001). Black melanoma patients have the highestrnproportion of deaths compared to whites and other races (39.4%, 13.7% and 21.0%rnrespectively). Patients diagnosed at late stage of melanoma were more likely to be malesrnand black. After adjusting by potential confounders, males were 22% (OR=1.2, 95%CI=1.2-rn1.3) more likely to be diagnosed at late stage compared with females. White patients werern80% (OR=0.2, 95%CI=0.1-0.2) less likely to be diagnosed at late stage compared with blackrnpatients. In the adjusted model, patients who were diagnosed at a later stage were morernlikely to die from melanoma and the primary site of diagnosed were NOS/overlapping lesionrnof the skin and the lower extremities (OR= 19.8, OR= 1.3, OR=9.9 respectively p-value=rn<0.001). Conclusion: Males were more likely to have late stage melanoma than females.rnBlacks were more likely to have late stage melanoma than whites. Gender and racialrndifferences in the stages of melanoma might be explained by access to healthcarerninequities or distinct etiological pathways. It remains a matter of future research.

Wearing Glasses in Medical Students Pages From : 05-08
Author(s) : Suliman Al- Aqeel,Ahmed Al- Abdulsalam,Saad Al- Huwaimel,Mohammed Aljarie,Abdulrahman Al- Aql,Abdulaziz A Al- Haqbani
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    Our article discusses the effect of wearing (glasses, contact lenses) and its effect on arnstudent's life, mainly in Al-Imam University medical students of whom have myopia and itsrneffect on their academic life. Our objectives were to determine causes of vision problems inrnAl-Imam medical students and to verify the relationship between myopia/hyperopia andrnstudent performance. Materials and Methods Design : a questionnaire study Subjects orrnparticipants : Third-year Al-Imam medical students who are myopic or hyperopic (wearingrnglasses) and the type of sampling is a non-randomized sampling. Instruments: arnquestionnaires papers.The type of study we are doing in our research is a descriptive study,rnwhich is a cross-sectional study because we are studying the relationship between therndiseases which are myopia and hyperopia with the medical students IQ.We took a group ofrn50 male students who wear glasses in Al-Imam University and used an SPSS program torncomplete our survey.

Multifocal intraocular lens Pages From : 09-13
Author(s) : Article Review
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     Dr. Javitt and Dr. Steinert offered thoer insights on using multiofocal lens in the Opthalmology journal. They said that., Around 2 million cataract extractions are performed annually in the United States. The procedure is nearly always accompanied by implantation of a monofocal intraocular lens (IOL), which corrects the patient’s distance vision. The authors’ objective was to measure visual function and quality-of-life outcomes associated with bilateral implantation of a multifocal IOL, which corrects distance and near vision, and to compare the outcomes with those of the standard therapy. A sample of 245 cataract patients, 127 of whom received the multifocal IOL bilaterally and 118 of whom received a monofocal IOL of nearly identical construction bilaterally. Clinical data included randomized, double-masked, clinical trial was conducted at eight sites in the United States, seven sites in Germany, and one site in Austria. Also visual acuity (VA), complications, and adverse events. Quality-of-life data were collected using a previously validated survey instrument at baseline, after first eye surgery, and after second eye surgery.
 
At 3 months after surgery, patients who had received multifocal IOLs had significantly better uncorrected and distance corrected binocular near VA compared with patients who had received monofocal IOLs (mean uncorrected VA, 20/26 multifocal vs. 20/40 monofocal; mean distance corrected VA, 20/28 multifocal vs. 20/45 monofocal; P < 0.0001). Additionally, 96% of patients who had received multifocal IOLs and 65% of patients who had received monofocal IOLs achieved both 20/40 and J3 (Jaeger) or better uncorrected, binocular distance and near visual acuities (P < 0.0001). Patients who had received multifocal IOLs were more likely than patients who had received monofocal IOLs to never wear glasses overall (32% multifocal vs. 8% monofocal; P < 0.0001). On a 4-point scale, patients who had received multifocal IOLs on average reported having between “a little bit” and “some” glare or halo, whereas patients who had received monofocal IOLs reported between “none” and “a little bit” of glare or halo (1.57 vs. 0.43; P < 0.001). Patients who had received multifocal IOLs rated their vision without glasses better overall at near and at intermediate distances (P ≤ 0.002) and demonstrated better visual function for near tasks and social activities. Cataract patients who received multifocal IOLs at time of surgery obtained better uncorrected and distance corrected near VA and reported better overall vision, less limitation in visual function, less spectacle dependency, and more glare or halo than those who received traditional monofocal IOLs.
 
Reference : Dr. Javitt & Dr. Steinert., “Cataract extraction with multifocal intraocular lens implantation” Opthamology, Volume 107, Issue 11, Nov.2000, Pages 2040–2048.
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